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The Standard Q2 2011

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2nd Quarter 2011
July 2010 - June 2011

Industry Perspectives

The Critical First Year

It’s no secret that recruiting physicians in today’s competitive environment requires a significant investment of resources – time, money, and energy. When you sign the ideal candidate, however, your work is not done. Even more important than recruiting a new doctor is retaining him or her for the long haul. Here’s how to protect your investment by staying engaged with new physicians during the critical first year.

Deliver a gracious welcome. A newly recruited physician should know the moment he or she steps through your door on day one that you’re happy they are there and that you’ve been preparing for this day. A welcome breakfast is a nice touch, and if you want to go the extra mile, have flowers delivered (yes, even to a male doctor) on the morning of their first day on the job, and have a gourmet basket waiting for them when they arrive home that afternoon. On a practical level, make sure the doctor’s office and exam rooms are ready, that they have a security badge and parking permit, and that they have someone to go to with questions during those confusing first days on the job.

Provide orientation. A new doctor will likely be chomping at the bit to start seeing patients, and you’ll no doubt be just as anxious to have that happen. But taking the time to provide a proper orientation pays off. Depending on the size and complexity of your organization and the physician’s specialty, an orientation may take only a half-day, or last for several days. Don’t make the mistake of overwhelming the very doctor you spent so much energy on to recruit by saying, “Here’s your office, there’s your medical assistant, good luck,” and hoping somehow everything will work out.

Review expectations. The physician who begins work in August may have signed a contract last December. Even though expectations were made clear during the interview process, review everything again – clinic hours, patient load, call, referral policies, and so forth. Taking the time to have this conversation helps avoid the, “But, I didn’t know,” discussion down the road.

Assign a mentor. Taking into account the personalities and interests of both doctors, assign a senior physician to mentor each doctor you recruit. Let mentor and mentee work out for themselves how the relationship unfolds. In some cases, the mentor will advise a new doctor mostly around clinical and operational matters, but don’t be surprised to see genuine friendships develop.

Have a check-in meeting. At the end of week two, schedule lunch with the new doctor and a few others who are in positions to listen and provide resolution to any problem that may have cropped up. The group might include the doctor’s mentor, the CEO, medical director, practice administrator, or some combination thereof. Go beyond just asking “how it’s going?” Dig into details by posing questions such as: 1. How’s the patient load? 2. Any issues with your colleagues? 3. How are things going with your medical assistant? 4. Any issues with the computer system that you’re unclear about? 5. Do you have the supplies and equipment you need? If there is any sign of trouble brewing, this is the time to find out about it – not in six or nine months when it may be too late. (Note: Repeat this process about once a quarter throughout the critical first year.)

Find out how the family is doing. If your new physician has a family (spouse, children, aging parents, the world’s best dog), make an effort to find out how everyone is doing since relocating. The person best suited for this job may be the individual who was most involved in the recruiting process. Within reason, do what you can to make the family feel welcome and integrated into the community. This might include making business introductions, hosting a dinner party to connect the couple with potential new friends, or simply checking in by phone occasionally.

Keep an eye on production. Assuming you have the patient volume to keep a new physician busy, he or she should be up to speed in terms of meeting productivity goals within six months, give or take. At that point, if the numbers are not where you think they should be, open a dialogue about what the cause might be, and look for solutions. That said, if a highly skilled, dependable, and well-liked family physician is seeing 22 patients a day instead of the 24 that you’d hoped for, don’t turn it into a point of contention. Allowing for reasonable variances from doctor to doctor is usually a smart business move. In other words, don’t be penny wise and pound foolish.

Placements & Interviews

Placement Data by Specialty

This data represents average statistics of placements and interviews by Delta Physician Placement over the twelve-month survey period. Since these averages only include placements and interviews, the compensation information presented indicates the rate at which candidates are choosing to interview or sign. Average days information can be used to forecast a probable timeline for a recruitment effort in a particular specialty.

Average Compensation Average Days
Starting Compensation Sign-on Bonus Total Annual Compensation From Interview to Placement Total Placements Fastest Days-to-Fill
Primary Care
Family Medicine $188,189 $23,232 $242,000 32 124 21
Internal Medicine $193,950 $25,775 $248,210 37 144 40
Pediatrics $178,534 $18,935 $205,975 34 141 41
Psychiatry $207,830 $21,279 $241,288 35 129 64
Obstetrics/Gynecology $276,520 $22,400 $335,720 29 124 55
Surgery
General Surgery $356,173 $53,409 $420,130 56 145 35
Orthopedic Surgery $521,277 $54,473 $595,454 37 136 74
Otolaryngology $397,777 $61,250 $494,111 53 121 60
Urology $418,411 $41,600 $418,868 52 120 75
Sub-Specialty
Cardiology $436,136 $36,428 $497,142 81 213 164
Oncology
$376,618
$35,767
$415,816
43
108
38
Neurology
$266,764  $26,176  $333,736  18  147  40 
Gastroenterology $513,888 $44,500 $571,684 11 111 26
Hospital-Based
Anesthesiology $387,727 $34,090 $432,545 20 147 94
Hospitalist $217,116 $17,500 $263,318 33 92 7
Emergency Medicine $264,540 $33,157 $282,132 30 75 15

Data reflects averages from placements and interviews by Delta Physician Placement from July 2010 through June 2011. “Total Annual Compensation” data reflects average yearly compensation at full production excluding benefits. “Average Days” data does not include off-contract placements. “Average Days Total Placement” data is calculated from profile to placement.


Placements by Population

Data indicates the percentage of placements made from July 2010 through June 2011 by the population of the search facility’s metropolitan area.

Candidate Sources

Data indicates sources of candidates for placements and interviews from July 2010 through June 2011.

Placement Statistics by Specialty Grouping

Primary Care Sugery Sub-Specialty Hospital Based
Currently In-Practice 79% 71% 86% 62%
Offered Salary (no guarantee) 84% 70% 76% 75%

Data is based on placements made from July 2010 through June 2011.

Market Demand

Nationwide Search Distribution

Map represents searches initiated by Delta Physician Placement on behalf of healthcare facilities from July 2010 through June 2011.



Specialty Demand Comparison

2nd Quarter 2011 2nd Quarter 2010
1. Family Medicine
Family Medicine
2. Internal Medicine Internal Medicine
3. Psychiatry Orthopedic Surgery
4. Orthopedic Surgery Psychiatry
5. Emergency Medicine Emergency Medicine
6. Pediatrics Urology
7. Obstetrics/Gynecology
Pediatrics
8. Gastroenterology
Neurosurgery
9. ENT Obstetrics/Gynecology
10. Neurology Gastroenterology
11. Hospitalist Pulmonary Critical Care
12. Urology Hospitalist
13. Pulmonary Critical Care ENT
14. Neurology Dermatology
15. Dermatology Oncology

Data compares the top 15 most requested searches initiated by Delta Physician Placement, comparing the 2nd quarters of 2010 and 2011.

Search Specialty Distribution

Data indicates the percentage of searches initiated by specialty grouping between July 2010 through June 2011.



Candidate Placements

Top 5 States Providers Have
Taken New Opportunities
1. Nebraska
2. Texas
3. Alabama
4. Alaska
5. North Carolina/Illinois

Compares all states for the top 5 candidate placements as initiated by Delta Physician Placement from July 2010 through June 2011.

Locum Tenens

Days Requested

Specialty Number of Days
1. Hospitalist 45,795
2. Emergency Medicine 16,964
3. Family Medicine 13,219
4. Psychiatry 8,720
5. Nurse Practitioner 5,433

Data indicates the top five specialties by days requested from July 2010 through June 2011. .

Nationwide Physician Distribution

Map represents the percentage of licensed physicians by region working with Delta Locum Tenens.

Privileging

Lowest Average
to Close Credentialing
Number of Days Highest Average
to Close Credentialing
Number of Days
1. Nebraska 16 1. Oklahoma 91
2. Colorado 17 2. Connecticut 85
3. Ohio 17 3. Wyoming 78
4. Utah 18 4. Wisconsin 73
5. Louisiana 25 5. Maryland 66

Total Privileging
files Completed

538

Average days
to complete a file

38

DData indicates total number of days - highest and lowest for a state to close credentialling from July 2010 through June 2011. This data represents all states Delta Locum Tenens has done business in during the past 12 months.

2nd Quarter 2011
July 2010 - June 2011

Industry Perspectives

Who's On Your Team

As the executive in charge of attracting new nurses, therapists, and physician extenders to your facility, you know that the recruitment process is complex and that getting the job done requires a wide range of talents. You can improve your odds of being successful with recruiting if you assemble a winning team of people committed to the goal of landing the best candidates. The composition of your team will vary, depending on the size of your facility and how much recruiting you do on an annual basis. Here’s a list of potential players for a recruiting team, with brief descriptions of the roles they fill.

The team captain. If at all possible, candidates should have a single point person with whom they communicate from the initial phone or e-mail contact right on through to when a contract is signed or an offer of employment is extended.The team captain must be readily available to candidates when they have questions and concerns during the recruiting process, and work closely with the other players on the team. This individual should be knowledgeable about the internal workings (and politics) of the organization, what each position involves, and be able to discuss the community. The team captain should have an above average level of emotional intelligence, be charismatic but not pushy, and have a good memory for details (i.e., not confuse John the physician assistant who likes mountain biking with Joe the nurse practitioner who is an avid hunter).

Site visit coordinator. The importance of the day or two that candidates spend in your facility and touring your community cannot be overstated. A good site visit coordinator (who may also be the team captain, depending on how much recruiting you do) leaves nothing to chance and goes to great lengths to customize visits to meet the needs of each candidate. This person’s job is to find out what’s important to the individual being recruited, as well as what that person’s spouse or significant other needs to know and see during the visit in order to make a decision to relocate. The site visit coordinator should be well connected in the community and have a sixth sense for assessing personality types and matching candidates with people they should meet during the visit.

Colleagues ready to help out. A candidate considering your organization will want to know who they’d be working with were they to come on board. In addition to the customary handshake greetings that occur during departmental tours, have employees lined up who are willing tohave meals or meetings with candidates during the site visit. Take this connection process one step further by providing interviewees with contact information for the people they meet while they’re visiting so that they can follow-up by phone or e-mail.

Competent real estate agents. Depending on your community, you may be able to choose a handful of real estate professionals to show candidates around during their visit. Make sure the agents you invite to be involved know what your expectations are. Find out from candidates ahead of time if they want to look at individual properties on their first visit to the community, or simply be driven around to get a feel for the neighborhoods. Following each site visit, check in with the real estate agent to see how the tour went. They often pick up on nuances about candidates that can help you seal the deal.

Representatives from schools, places of worship, civic organizations, etc. Your site visit coordinator should have connections with individuals from the community who are willing to meet with candidates while they’re in town. Something as simple as introducing the pharmacist who happens to be a master quilter to the proprietor of the local fabric shop, setting up a round of golf or a tennis match for your RN candidate, or inviting a local teacher to have lunch with the physical therapist who has small children can make the difference between winning over the candidate you’re courting and having them go home feeling uninspired about your community. Given the shortage of healthcare professionals in so many critical areas today, taking the recruiting process seriously by making sure that you have a wining team in place is good business.

Placements & Interviews

Placement Data by Specialty

This data represents average statistics of placements and interviews by Delta Physician Placement over the twelve-month survey period. Since these averages only include placements and interviews, the compensation information presented indicates the rate at which candidates are choosing to interview or sign. Average days information can be used to forecast a probable timeline for a recruitment effort in a particular specialty.

Average Compensation Average Days
Starting Compensation Sign-on Bonus Total Annual Compensation From Interview to Placement Total Placements Fastest Days-to-Fill
Rehabilitation
Physical Therapy $81,180 $8,972 $88,720 11 104 7
Occupational Therapy $73,050 $8,362 $76,238 13 113 13
Speech Language Pathology $66,493 $2,500 $66,493 7 66 6
Extenders
Nurse Practitioner $94,407 $6,867 $99,985 9 73 33
Physician Assistant $95,022 $9,867 $111,688 14 81 16
Allied/Other
Registered Nurse $75,461 $7,750 $79,154 6 61 30
Pharmacy $124,880 $7,000 $138,880 12 44 27
Medical Technology $56,736 $2,000 $60,332 8 64 35

Data reflects averages from placements and interviews by Delta Healthcare Placement from July 2010 to June 2011. “Total Annual Compensation” data reflects average yearly compensation at full production excluding benefits. “Average Days” data does not include off-contract placements. “Average Days Total Placement” data is calculated from profile to placement.


Placements by Population

Data indicates the percentage of placements made from July 2010 through June 2011 by the population of the search facility’s metropolitan area.

Years of Experience

Data indicates the average years experience of candidates for placements and interviews from July 2010 through June 2011.

Market Demand

Nationwide Search Distribution

Map represents searches initiated by Delta Healthcare Placement on behalf of healthcare facilities from July 2010 through June 2011.



Candidate Placements

Top 5 States Providers Have
Taken New Opportunities
1. Texas
2. Alaska
3. Iowa
4. New Mexico
5. Georgia

Compares all states for the top 5 candidate placements as initiated by Delta Healthcare Placement from July 2010 through June 2011.

Specialty Demand Comparison

2nd Quarter 2011 2nd Quarter 2010
1. Physical Therapy Physical Therapy
2. Occupational Therapy Occupational Therapy
3. Director/Executive
Nurse Practitioner
4. Nurse Practitioner
Director/Executive
5. Physician Assistant  Physician Assistant 

Data compares the top 5 most requested searches initiated by Delta Healthcare Placement in the second quarters of 2010 and 2011.

Travelers

Assignments by Specialty

Specialty Average Length Contract
to Start Date
Average Length
of Assignment
Physical Therapy 4.5 weeks 13.1 weeks
Physical Therapy Assistant 3.8 weeks 11.5 weeks
Occupational Therapy 4.5 weeks 12.8 weeks
COTA 4.5 weeks 13 weeks
Speech Language Pathology 6 weeks 11.4 weeks

All Travelers data is compiled from assignments placed by Delta Flex Travelers from July 2010 through June 2011.



Facility Demographics



Years of Experience

All Travelers data is compiled from assignments placed by Delta Flex Travelers from July 2010 through June 2011.

Top Licensure States

Map represents top licensure states by Delta Flex Travelers on behalf of healthcare facilities from April 2011 through June 2011.



Licenses Per Quarter

Data is compiled from by Delta Flex Travelers from April 2011 through June 2011.



Licensure Cost

Specialty Average Cost of License
Physical Therapy $327.50
Occupational Therapy $305.00
Physical Therapy Assistant $262.50
Speech Language Pathology $237.50
COTA $235.00

All travelers data is compiled from assignments over 2 years placed by Delta Flex Travelers from June 2009 through June 2011.