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The Standard Q2 2012

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2nd Quarter 2012 
July 2011 - June 2012

Industry Perspectives

Creative Wins

Andy Guenther and Jeremy Rodriguez, Delta Physician Placement

Tools for Recruitment

Housing

One trend that is becoming popular with many hiring facilities is offering temporary housing at a reduced cost for the first few months of an assignment. This helps relieve some of the stress associated with relocation for incoming providers that are new to the area. Physicians can spend their first few weeks on assignment focusing on responsibilities and orientation plus have a chance to learn about their new community—instead of feeling pressured to find the perfect home without any knowledge of the surrounding area. Many facilities have purchased or rented homes to temporarily host new employees, and some have even gone as far as sending a welcoming DVD to new providers with an introductory video containing facility information and options for temporary housing.

Offering an appealing package

Often, creative financial packaging can be established simply by evaluating facility needs. For instance, offering a directorship with a position opening can fulfill administrative responsibilities within your organization and attract incoming physicians looking for leadership experience. Some organizations have also adopted the policy of presenting open contracts to candidates, which allow physicians the freedom to terminate an assignment without penalty. Under this contract, managers aim to boost engagement and pride within an organization by making the facility an enjoyable place to work—so their physicians would never want to leave.

Another practice to consider is providing stipends to incoming graduates for signing-on to an organization. After agreeing to work with a facility, these quality-of-life stipends help support students as they complete necessary school and training prior to employment.

Adding a personal touch

Making the extra effort to stand out among preferred candidates can often help finalize an offer—sometimes, even small details can have a huge impact. Incoming physicians, particularly those who will be relocating to your facility, are very interested in the community they will be servicing. For some clients, sending a welcoming package with the local newspaper,information about the facility, and tidbits from the surrounding area (particularly if customized to the candidate’s interests) help to make an incoming physician feel welcome in their new home. Perhaps something as simple as leaving a new lab coat in an interviewee’s hotel room can help translate a welcoming and encouraging culture for your facility. Many hiring organizations have paid to bring a favored candidate’s spouse into town for a facility and community tour, prior to the candidate’s interview. Facility managers in these cases recognized the spouse was such a large part of the decision making process that they invested in bringing them out to assess the community, and if the spouse was sold upfront, it took a lot of pressure off of the interview.

What is a creative day-to-day?

Flexible Scheduling

While offering a choice between four 10-hour days, or working a regular 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. schedule has become somewhat of a norm in recruitment, offering a creative solution to flexible scheduling is still possible. Job sharing, or dividing a fulltime position into multiple part-time positions, is becoming a popular trend, particularly with difficult to fill positions. Some facilities may have difficultly in finding a provider willing to work fulltime due to the community’s location or a provider’s preference. However, allocating this same position into part-time schedules and adjusting the compensation accordingly may be more appealing for providers interested in open schedules. This also opens the doors to a larger pool of candidates that would consider part-time employment. This form of flexible scheduling can be determined by facility and provider preferences, and can range from two physicians working certain days per week, or alternating a one-week-on, one-week-off setup.

Other trends

Community forgiveness loans are a rare practice that can be very attractive to physicians during their first few years of service. Once a physician has agreed to work with a particular organization, the surrounding community offers a welcoming loan, which is forgiven over a set period of time. For example, for every year a physician agrees to service a community, 25 percent of the loan is relieved.

Boosting Retention

Communication is the key to retention—this can be said of any type of organization. When an employee feels their voice is being heard, they feel engaged; engagement boosts pride; proud employees typically work harder and remain loyal to their organization. One way to ensure you are receiving feedback from your staff is by issuing reoccurring surveys that poll providers on what types of improvements they would like to see implemented within the facility. Once this feedback is available, facility managers can act on the information.

A great example of this technique was demonstrated by a bustling facility in Tennessee. After conducting a poll, an overwhelming majority of physicians with children expressed a need for childcare during working hours. To accommodate this need, facility managers invested in an onsite, higher learning facility with no charge to employed physicians. The daycare facility was also opened to the surrounding community for a regular fee. The return on this investment was a facility full of focused providers whose needs had been resolved—not to mention, a direct link to community members with children in need of daytime care.

Placements & Interviews

Placement Data by Specialty

This data represents average statistics of placements and interviews by Delta Physician Placement over the twelve-month survey period. Since these averages only include placements and interviews, the compensation information presented indicates the rate at which candidates are choosing to interview or sign. Average days information can be used to forecast a probable timeline for a recruitment effort in a particular specialty.

Average Compensation Average Days
Starting Compensation Sign-on Bonus Potential Compensation From Interview to Placement Total Placement Fastest Days-to-Fill
Primary Care
Family Medicine $191,355 $20,196 $248,022 46 175 3
Internal Medicine $212,613 $24,561 $291,438 62 161 28
Pediatrics $192,714 $25,714 $224,714 45 122 60
Psychiatry $212,300 $20,208 $230,668 52 152 42
Obstetrics/Gynecology $278,172 $21,200 $350,084 45 146 68
Surgery
General Surgery $343,292 $28,163 $437,398 46 150 29
Orthopedic Surgery $492,850 $36,923 $665,714 74 126 83
Otolaryngology $395,000 $52,000 $502,118 95 305 15
Urology $406,870 $34,700 $498,725 58 230 82
Sub-Specialty
Cardiology $455,000 $26,315 $608,225   84 40
Oncology
$417,464
$47,142
$499,713
77
213
138
Neurology
$259,473 $32,105 $301,900 52 142 109
Pulmonary Critical Care $370,222 $29,333 $458,000 23 70 57
Gastroenterology $478,633 $30,000 $623,250 93 165 19
Hospital-Based
Anesthesiology $398,226 $24,167 $485,833 20 122 45
Radiology $500,000 $40,118 $610,288 80 101 101
Hospitalist $228,245 $21,250 $269,111 38 122 76
Emergency Medicine $278,188 $28,016 $333,744 37 122 29

Data reflects averages from placements and interviews by Delta Physician Placement from July 2011 through June 2012. “Total Annual Compensation” data reflects average yearly compensation at full production excluding benefits. “Average Days” data does not include off-contract placements. “Average Days Total Placement” data is calculated from profile to placement.


Placements by Population

Data indicates the percentage of placements made from July 2011 through June 2012 by the population of the search facility’s metropolitan area.

Candidate Sources

Data indicates sources of candidates for placements and interviews from July 2011 through June 2012.

Market Demand

Nationwide Search Distribution

Map represents searches initiated by Delta Physician Placement on behalf of healthcare facilities from July 2011 through June 2012.



Specialty Demand Comparison

2nd Quarter 2012 2nd Quarter 2011
1. Family Medicine
Family Medicine
2. Internal Medicine Internal Medicine
3. Emergency Medicine Psychiatry
4. Hospitalist Orthopedic Surgery
5. General Surgery Emergency Medicine
6. Psychiatry Pediatrics
7. Obstetrics/Gynecology
Obstetrics/Gynecology
8. Urology
Gastroenterology
9. Pediatrics Otolaryngology
10. Pulmonary Critical Care Neurology
11. Family Medicine/Obstetrics Hospitalist
12. Neurology Urology
13. Gastroenterology Pulmonary Critical Care
14. Orthopedic Surgery General Surgery
15. Otolaryngology

Dermatology

Data compares the top 15 most requested searches initiated by Delta Physician Placement, comparing the 2nd Quarters of 2011 and 2012.

Search Specialty Distribution

Data indicates the percentage of searches initiated by specialty grouping between July 2011 through June 2012.



Candidate Placements

Top 5 States Providers Have
Taken New Opportunities
1. North Dakota
2. North Carolina
3. Alaska
4. Colorado
5. Arkansas

Compares all states for the top 5 candidate placements as initiated by Delta Physician Placement from July 2011 through June 2012.

Locum Tenens

Days Requested

Specialty Number of Days
1. Hospitalist 39,329
2. Family Medicine 16,870
3. Emergency Medicine 16,421
4. Nurse Practitioner 7,799
5. Psychiatry 6,050

Data indicates the top five specialties by days requested from July 2011 through June 2012.

Nationwide Physician Distribution

Map represents the percentage of licensed physicians by region working with Delta Locum Tenens.

Privileging

Lowest Average
to Close Credentialing
Number of Days Lowest Average
to Close Credentialing
Number of Days
1. Iowa 11 6. Michigan 20
2. North Dakota 12 7. Ohio 24
3. Oklahoma 14 8. Virginia 29
4. Arizona 16 9. Montana 30
5. Utah 18 10. Wyoming 32

Total Privileging
files Completed

613

Average days
to complete a file

40

Data indicates total number of days - highest and lowest for a state to close credentialling from July 2011 through June 2012. This data represents all states Delta Locum Tenens has done business in during the past 12 months.

2nd Quarter 2012 
July 2011 - June 2012

Industry Perspectives

Who is the Traveler: Myth vs. Reality

Ryan Anholt, Senior Director of Recruiting, Delta Flex Travelers

Travelers are fully qualified providers working with a flexible schedule, throughout various locations. A typical assignment for a traveler averages 13 weeks, depending on the need of the facility served. According to data from this quarter’s Recruiting Standard, the traveler’s lifestyle appeals most to providers with fewer than five years experience, or over 10 years experience. Typically, these age brackets include new graduates eager to absorb knowledge, and seasoned providers willing to spread their expertise.

But who is the traveler,really? What motivatesthese individuals to explore a traveling position or take on a new facility? For many organizations, these questions remain unanswered or leave room for misconceptions and false assumptions about the lifestyle of the traveler. In order to better understand the role, and perhaps determine if your facility has the need for such a provider, it is important to discuss and expunge common myths associated with healthcare travelers.

Myth 1: Providers travel because they cannot work full-time

This statement is simply untrue. Rather, providers choose to travel to accommodate their lifestyle. Motivation for this choice could be self-serving— some travelers want to see the country and explore new territory while maintaining a steady income. After wrapping up an assignment in the northeast, a provider may try heading south to explore the culture and customs of the southwest. Others are inspired by the fundamental appeal of helping others. Knowing that a particular facility is in need and can benefit from their expertise draws these travelers from region to region. One provider explained that working as a traveler allows him to structure his assignment schedules with time off during summer, which he dedicates to mission trips with his church. Working in a full-time position would not likely provide this flexibility.

Myth 2: Travelers cannot provide consistent care

Good travelers are eager to learn and have a zeal for new experiences. As a provider moves across different facilities, he or she can learn new processes and techniques from experts in each area. While open to guidance, travelers are also willing to share their knowledge. New techniques can be passed on to providers in the next facility at which the traveler takes an assignment.

Myth 3: A traveler will not connect with my facility or community

In addition to sharing knowledge, good travelers typically exude a passion for their job, which can be infectious to other providers. Although an assignment is temporary, travelers are still eager to connect with other employees and form lasting professional relationships. Often, travelers on assignment are also very engaged with community activities. In a small town in Virginia, one traveler took a 6-month position working with a facility dedicated to assisting with children with disabilities. During her assignment, the traveler helped develop and promote a city basketball team for her patients. Within her short assignment, this provider took great strides in drawing a community together.

Myth 4: Travelers cost too much

Travelers are employed by staffing agencies, and therefore do require a fee for placement costs. However, the level of availability a traveler presents offsets this expense. Typically, facilities need travelers to fill an immediate position— for instance, filling in for another provider who is on maternity leave. If this role is left open, patient flow will suffer causing a decline in the facility’s revenue. Placing a traveler in a needed position can actually save a facility time and money by maintaining a regular patient load. Additionally, travelers are ready to begin work from their first day of arrival. By resourcing a staffing agency, all credentialing requirements, licensing, housing arrangements, travel expenses, and administrative prerequisites are the responsibility of the recruitment firm, not the hiring organization.

Myth 5: My facility has to be located near a buzzing attraction to appeal to good travelers

Travelers thrive on new experiences and are attracted to assignments that fit to their needs. A recruiting agent holds the responsibility of matching these needs with those of the hiring organization. For travelers who value providing quality care to patients in need, proximity to a thriving city or exotic destination is not necessarily a priority. Instead, these providers are motivated by the chance to build relationships, plan their schedule, and transfer knowledge through new experiences.

It is important for facility representatives to identify with the traveler in order to fully understand their options during the recruitment process. Recruiters that understand the needs of both temporary and permanent providers have the best advantage toward connecting a quality provider to an organization in need.

Placements & Interviews

Placement Data by Specialty

This data represents average statistics of placements and interviews by Delta Healthcare Placement over the twelve-month survey period. Since these averages only include placements and interviews, the compensation information presented indicates the rate at which candidates are choosing to interview or sign. Average days information can be used to forecast a probable timeline for a recruitment effort in a particular specialty.

Average Compensation Average Days
Starting Compensation Sign-on Bonus Student Loan Repayment Relocation Reimbursement From Interview to Placement Total Placements Fastest Days-to-Fill
Rehabilitation
Physical Therapy $80,544 $9,193 $31,810 $4,019 25 95 9
Occupational Therapy $76,564 $6,493 $19,000 $4,940 21 82 13
Speech Language Pathology $63,910 $7,529 $23,636 $3,979 7 112 34
Extenders
Nurse Practitioner $95,997 $7,566 $33,413 $7,567 20 96 8
Physician Assistant $100,085 $7,750 $25,818 $4,486 7 79 21
Allied/Other
Registered Nurse $69,786 $3,647 $33,285 $6,426 13 65 14
Pharmacy $113,429 $5,000 $2,000 $3,785 10 49 21
Medical Technology $56,772 $1,500 $2,000 $4,625 22 50 21

Data reflects averages from placements and interviews by Delta Healthcare Placement from July 2011 through June 2012. “Total Annual Compensation” data reflects average yearly compensation at full production excluding benefits. “Average Days” data does not include off-contract placements. “Average Days Total Placement” data is calculated from profile to placement.


Placements by Population

Data indicates the percentage of placements made from July 2011 through June 2012 by the population of the search facility’s metropolitan area.

Years of Experience

Data indicates the average years experience of candidates for placements and interviews from July 2011 through June 2012.

Market Demand

Nationwide Search Distribution

Map represents searches initiated by Delta Healthcare Placement on behalf of healthcare facilities from July 2011 through June 2012.



Candidate Placements

Top 5 States Providers Have
Taken New Opportunities
1. Texas
2. Alaska
3. California
4. Ohio
5. Missouri

Compares all states for the top 5 candidate placements as initiated by Delta Healthcare Placement from July 2011 through June 2012.

Specialty Demand Comparison

2nd Quarter 2012 2nd Quarter 2011
1. Physical Therapy Physical Therapy
2. Occupational Therapy Occupational Therapy
3. Nurse Practitioner Director/Executive
4. Registered Nurse
Nurse Practitioner
5. Physician Assistant Physician Assistant

Data compares the top 5 most requested searches initiated by Delta Healthcare Placement in the 2nd Quarters of 2011 and 2012.

Travelers

Assignments by Specialty

Specialty Average Length Contract
to Start Date
Average Length
of Assignment
Physical Therapy 4.8 weeks 12 weeks
Physical Therapy Assistant 3.9 weeks 10 weeks
Occupational Therapy 4.2 weeks 12 weeks
COTA 3.7 weeks 11 weeks
Speech Language Pathology 5.6 weeks 12 weeks

Data is compiled from assignments placed by Delta Flex Travelers from July 2011 through June 2012.



Facility Demographics



Years of Experience

Data is compiled from assignments placed by Delta Flex Travelers from July 2011 through June 2012.

Top Licensure States

Map represents top licensure states by Delta Flex Travelers on behalf of healthcare facilities from July 2011 through June 2012.



Licenses Per Quarter

Data is compiled from by Delta Flex Travelers from July 2011 through June 2012.



Licensure Cost

Specialty Average Cost of License
Physical Therapy $251.90
Physical Therapy Assistant $263.10
Occupational Therapy $168.45
COTA $151.25
Speech Language Pathology $217.50

Data is compiled from assignments over 2 years placed by Delta Flex Travelers from July 2010 through June 2012.