Subscribe  |  Past Issues

The Standard Q4 2015

Choose which Standard you would like to view:

 






Industry Perspectives

Getting the most from your investment with Locum Tenens

By: Marcus Lillie, Recruiting Consultant, Delta Locum Tenens

Utilizing locum tenens providers has been a tried and true way of ensuring seamless coverage for a healthcare facility, expanding patient care to new demographics, and managing the workflow of an understaffed team. As the demand for quality physicians continues to create a competitive recruitment arena, hiring facilities have turned to a few creative solutions for securing adequate talent for temporary work. Whether it be by adjusting the requirements of an open search or reconsidering the type of provider to add to your staff, Delta Locum Tenens has observed several best practices that can help you ensure the “best bang for your buck” with your locums services.
One consideration that hiring facilities often overlook is bringing in providers without board certification. Although certified physicians bring in higher reimbursement rates, hiring facilities should consider the types of locums candidates they overlook when dismissing non-certified healthcare providers. For example, a general surgeon that previously owned his/her own practice would not have needed board certification, yet still has years of tenure and experience to bring to a locums role.

According to a recent article posted by The Advisory Board Company (Doctors vs. boards), some doctors even protest the newly emerging requirements around certain certifications, such as the American Board of Internal Medicine’s requirement that physicians accrue MOC points every two or five years. In the article, American Colleges of Physicians President David Fleming stated that “doctors argue that the new rules are ‘expensive, burdensome, and detract from the care of the patient’.” He goes on to say “under new protocols, board certification will cost about $200 annually, plus about $1,400 for a practice unit to take the exam every decade. For physicians maintaining three specialties, certification may cost $500 a year. The rules are ‘not evidence-based’ and are so burdensome that they could ‘drive smaller practices out of business’.”
Instead, many Delta Locum Tenens clients have seen success in reviewing a candidate’s procedure log and casework, instead of certifications alone.

Another factor to consider in beginning a locums investment is the type of candidate you are willing to bring on board. For example, in a search for a primary care physician, hiring facilities that are willing to consider a nurse practitioner instead save money by hiring a locum at a much lower rate, who is still able to perform the majority of common procedures their patients need.

General practitioners are another great resource for facilities that haven’t considered these providers in the past, particularly in an urgent care setting. These doctors have the proper training to fill gaps in coverage by performing common procedures and are usually more willing to see a greater number of patients per day than most specialized physicians as they have lower reimbursement rates.

Being open minded in your locums search can lead to access to a greater pool of experienced and qualified candidates. This kind of innovation will not only help you to quickly fill gaps and expand coverage, but will also set you up to have a competitive edge over your competitors.

Placements & Interviews


Placements by Population

Placements by Population

Data indicates sources of candidates for placements and interviews from January 2015 through December 2015.

Candidate Sources

 

Candidate Sources

Data indicates sources of candidates for placements and interviews from January 2015 through December 2015.

Market Demand

Nationwide Search Distribution

 

Nationwide Search Distribution

Map represents searches initiated by Delta Physician Placement on behalf of healthcare facilities from January 2015 through December 2015.



Specialty Demand Comparison

  4th Quarter 2015 4th Quarter 2014
1. Family Medicine Family Medicine
2. Psychiatry Hospitalist
3. Internal Medicine Internal Medicine
4. Family Medicine - Obstetrics Neurology
5. Obstetrics & Gynecology Orthopedic Surgery
6. Emergency Medicine   Emergency Medicine
7. Hospitalist Family Medicine - Obstetrics
8. General Surgery Psychiatry
9. Orthopedic Surgery

General Surgery

10. Pediatrics Critical Care Medicine
11. Pulmonary Critical Care Endocrinology
12. Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Pediatrics
13.

Urgent Care

Urgent Care
14. Gastroenterology General Practice 
15. Infectious Disease

Geriatrics

Data compares the top 15 most requested searches initiated by Delta Physician Placement, comparing the fourth quarters of 2014 and 2015.

Search Distribution Specialty

 

Search Distribution Specialty

Data indicates the percentage of searches initiated by specialty grouping between January 2015 through December 2015.



Candidate Placements

  Top 5 States Providers Have
Taken New Opportunities
1. Wisconsin
2. Texas
3. Minnesota
4. Kansas
5. Iowa

Data is compiled from assignments placed by Delta Healthcare Providers from January 2015 through December 2015.

Locum Tenens

Days Requested - Top Specialties

 

Days Requested

Data indicates the top specialties by days requested from January 2015 through Deember 2015.

Nationwide Physician Distribution

Nationwide

Map represents searches initiated by Delta Physician Placement on behalf of healthcare facilities from January 2015 through December 2015.

4th Quarter 2015 
January 2015 - December 2015

Industry Perspectives

What Makes Travel Therapists Travel? How Does This Impact Patient Care?

By: Damaris Delp, Recruiting Principal, Delta Healthcare Providers 

A new year brings new opportunities, and travel therapy is no exception to the rule. As talented therapists begin to plan their goals for 2016, tried and true resolutions come to mind like “spend more time with family” or “travel more often.” Sure, most people resolve to do these things during the start of every year. The difference with these therapists; however, is that their career path sets them on a strong course of actually meeting these goals.

From a recruitment standpoint, new resolutions are a positive. Hiring facilities are faced with new opportunities to attract top talent as more and more therapists opt for travel assignments. With this in mind, Delta Healthcare Providers raised the question of what makes travel therapists choose a travel lifestyle, and how might this reasoning impact patient care.

Given the choice between a happy healthcare provider or one of indifference, most would take the obvious choice. Research has shown that the mindset of a provider can have great impact on patient care. Avoiding burnout and encouraging mindful, holistic patient interactions can have great benefits for all parties involved—happy therapists that enjoy their working conditions are more likely to encourage their patients and provide humanistic care; patients are more likely to listen and adhere to treatments and advise; facilities can see greater patient retention and referrals.

So, what is it that makes a travel therapist happy?

The Family
More often times than not, a travel therapist’s ideal location lands them near a close friend or relative. When you get to pick the city in which to perform your work, why not aim to be closer to your loved ones? In fact, one provider we interviewed utilizes the flexibility of travel assignments in order to spend more time with his grandson, instead of full retirement.

Incorporating a travel therapist to your staff that who an assignment near their family might mean adding a happy new face to your facility. Often, our travelers request opportunities in a drivable radius of their loved ones, which means facilities have the chance to capitalize on quality, tenured healthcare providers (or those eager to learn) through travel therapists happy to be near family and friends.

The Flexibility
It is no surprise that within a large majority of travel therapists lives a certain degree of wanderlust. Many of our travelers send photos from their downtime during active assignments. In fact, a current traveler in Texas gave a detailed account of his off-duty pass times to his recruiter when he visited a college football game, world-renowned music festival, local landmarks, and beautiful hiking trails—all within a 13-week assignment.

Again, this scenario of allowing a explorative traveler to satisfy his travel bug leads to happy healthcare. When a provider feels they have the freedom to devote their spare time to exploring their passions, it would stand to reason that their positive attitude would carry over into their work.

The Facility Itself
Another common reason therapists turn to travel is for the broad spectrum of experience they can gather in their careers. In a recent blog post, Delta Healthcare Providers interviewed one traveler who opted to leave the warm southern climate she knew to take a home health position in Michigan. In December. When asked why, this was her response:

“Initially, I was apprehensive about what providing therapy in the rural upper peninsula would mean. What I learned was it meant the freedom and time to provide one-on-one attention to my patients without being pressured with productivity quotas and an environment that fostered continuing education to be a better therapist. The staff is incredibly helpful and cooperative and the company has committed to building new state of the art facilities that will be available in the next year. Not only has the job been great but the area has allowed me to enjoy the outdoors and learn to ski, snow shoe, snow mobile, hike, paddleboard, boat, kayak, and enjoy the sun on the beaches of Lake Superior. I have loved my experience as a Yooper.”

In this case, the culture at the facility she served played a large factor in her happiness with her assignment. This goes to show that even a facility in a less-than-desirable location can still be a major player in attracting top talent by simply marketing the culture or technology that they can provide. Great staff, new technology, access to pass times they love—whatever makes you stand out could be the key to recruiting your next travel rockstar.

Placements & Interviews

Placement Data by Specialty

This data represents average statistics of placements and interviews by Delta Healthcare Providers over the twelve-month survey period. Since these averages only include placements and interviews, the compensation information presented indicates the rate at which candidates are choosing to interview or sign. Average days information can be used to forecast a probable timeline for a recruitment effort in a particular specialty.

  Average Compensation Average Days
  Starting Compensation Sign-on Bonus Student Loan Repayment Relocation Reimbursement From Interview to Placement Total Placements Fastest Days-to-Fill
Rehabilitation
Physical Therapy $80,975 $8,934 $15,136  $4,316 5 59 1
Occupational Therapy $80,975 $7,271 $21,829  $4,045 7 87 2
Speech Language Pathology $81,456 $3,500 $18,000 $3,250 4 54 21
Extenders
Nurse Practitioner $110,963 $8,688 $48,357 $5,886 13 104 15
Physician Assistant $118,000 $11,000 $42,000 $7,000 12 163 15
Allied/Other
Medical Technology $56,697 $5,000 - $2,750 4 45 20
Dentist  $139,818 $8,556 $43,750 $6,857 10 88 8
Psychologist $96,842 $13,333  $35,000  $5,833 7 93 20
Nursing
Registered Nurse $71,420 $7,500  $32,620  $7,442 6 85 6
Dir. of Nursing  $85,000 - - $5,000 19 69 61
Dir. of Surgical Services  $71,801 $30,000 - $5,000 6 85 85
Home Healthcare Dir. $92,000 $5,000 - $3,500 3 64 64
Nurse Manager of ICU $95,000 $5,000 - $5,000 3 17 17
Nurse Manager of OB/GYN $89,440 $8,000 - $12,500 3 37 37
Nurse Manager of Surgical Services $79,000 $5,000 - $5,000 29 111 111

This data represents average statistics of placements and interviews by Delta Healthcare Providers over the twelve-month survey period. Data was collected from December 2015 through January 2015. Since these averages only include placements and interviews, the compensation information presented is an indicator of the rate at which candidates are choosing to interview or sign. Average days information can be used to forecast a probable timeline for a recruitment effort in a particular specialty.


Placements by Population

Placements by Population

Data indicates the percentage of placements made from January 2015 through December 2015 by the population of the search facility's metropolitan area.

Years of Experience

Years of Experience

Data indicates the average years of experience of candidates for placements and interviews from January 2015 through December 2015.

Market Demand

Nationwide Search Distribution

Nationwide Search Distribution

Map represents searches initiated by Delta Healthcare Providers on behalf of healthcare facilities from January 2015 through December 2015.



 Candidate Placements

  Top 5 States Providers Have
Taken New Opportunities
1. Texas
2. Alaska
3. Arizona
4. Minnesota
5. Virginia

Data is compiled from assignments placed by Delta Healthcare Providers from January 2015 through December 2015.

Specialty Demand Comparison

  4th Quarter 2015 4th Quarter 2014
1. Registered Nurse Physical Therapist
2. Physical Therapist  Nurse Practitioner
3. Nurse Practitioner Physician Assistant
4. Dentist Registered Nurse
5. Occupational Therapist Occupational Therapist

Map represents searches initiated by Delta Physician Placement on behalf of healthcare facilities from January 2015 through December 2015.


Candidate Sources

 

Candidate Sources

Data indicates sources of candidates for placements and interviews from January 2015 through December 2015.

Staffing

Facility Demographics

Facility Demographics Charts

Data is compiled from assignments placed by Delta Healthcare Providers from July 2015 through October 2015.



Years of Experience 

Years of Experience

Data indicates the average years of experience of candidates for placements and interviews from January 2015 through December 2015.